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This Year's Scholars 2013


 
Michael Fox

Michael Fox

Michael Fox

Michael Fox is pursuing a Ph.D. in marine biology at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His dissertation will examine how nutrient pollution affects the dominant processes structuring competitive interactions between reef-building corals and macroalgae. Mike will be working within the Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary on Maui, HI, the Pacific Remote Islands National Marine Monument, and the Line Islands. His research aims to connect wastewater effluent to declines in live coral cover on Maui and to determine if the processes structuring coral-algal competition are consistent across a gradient of degraded to near-pristine reef systems. This project will provide a holistic perspective and key missing information about how coral reefs become algal dominated in the presence of local human impacts, helping to improve critical management strategies in Hawaii and beyond.

Mike received his B.A. from the University of San Diego and recently completed his M.S. at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories where he studied recovery from disturbance in giant kelp. Prior to beginning his Master's program Mike spent a year in the US Virgin Islands where he studied the impact of terrestrial development on coral reefs. Mike has spent the past 3 years working with the Center for Ocean Solutions where he developed a passion for conducting and communicating policy-relevant science. Having been fortunate enough to work in many diverse ecosystems ranging from the Antarctic to the sub-arctic, Mike is eager to return to the coral reef systems that inspired his career as a marine scientist.

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Tammy Lynne Silva

Shannon Lyday

Tammy Lynne Silva

Tammy Silva will pursue a Ph.D. in Marine Science at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Tammy received a M.S. in Marine Biology from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and a B.S. in Biology from Stonehill College. After completing her M.S., Tammy gained valuable field experience working as a staff member with the New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance and as a naturalist on whale watching vessels. Tammy has broad interests in marine mammal ecology and conservation including sensory systems, molecular ecology and how human activity influences marine mammal health and behavior. Her thesis research will involve using passive acoustics to examine the spatial and temporal distribution of odontocetes within the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS). By characterizing how top predators like odontocetes use the SBNMS, Tammy hopes to increase our understanding of an ecosystem that is critical for both marine species and for humans and to also reduce anthropogenic impacts on marine mammals. Her ultimate goals are to promote conservation of all marine resources and to use scientific research to support informed management decisions regarding marine ecosystems.

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Lindsay Marks

Jan Vicente

Lindsay Marks

Lindsay Marks is pursuing her doctorate in Marine Ecology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation research explores factors influencing the susceptibility of kelp forest communities to invasion by exotic species and how marine protected areas (MPAs) may affect this invasibility. Specifically, she is studying Sargassum horneri, an invasive seaweed recently introduced to southern California and rapidly spreading throughout the region, as a model species to address these questions with the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary.

Ms. Marks began working in kelp forest ecology while earning her B.S. in Marine Biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and cultivated an appreciation for this system after graduating when she worked for the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans (PISCO) as a subtidal technician. She has monitored reefs from Newport, Oregon all along the coast to Cambria, California as part of an initiative to assess the effectiveness of MPAs. Now, as a graduate student with the NSF-funded Santa Barbara Coastal Long Term Ecological Research (SBC LTER) program at UCSB, she has expanded her knowledge of kelp forest communities through monitoring reefs off the southern California mainland and Channel Islands. Her first-hand experience of the incredible diversity and variability of kelp forests along the Pacific coast has motivated Ms. Marks to pursue research aimed at understanding the factors influencing the structure of these communities, and to inform policies designed to preserve them. After completing her Ph.D., she plans to continue working as a researcher at a university, government agency or non-profit environmental organization.

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